Beauty and comfort in your home
+1 (438) 923 64 28
Call order
26 March 2021
The Silk Road from China
The Silk Road trade route was initiated about 2,100 years ago for trade and travel from China's Han Empire to Central Asia and Europe, and it revolutionized the world until it declined about the year 1368.
What Was China's Silk Road?
The Silk Road was the world's most significant trade route that connected East and West for two thousand years. It started in the Yellow River basin where China's first civilizations developed. From ancient Chinese capitals, Xi'an and Luoyang, it passed through the arid Gansu Corridor and remote west of China, and beyond to Central Asia and Europe.
The Western Han Empire initiated Silk Road trading by sending silk traders westward.

The Significance of the Silk Road
Trade and travel between east and west caused revolutionary changes in everything from culture, religion, and technology to the emergence of huge empires and the disappearance of many small tribes, kingdoms, and empires.
Trade and travel between east and west caused revolutionary changes in everything from culture, religion, and technology to the emergence of huge empires and the disappearance of many small tribes, kingdoms, and empires.

The inventions of paper and gunpowder in China were so powerful that when the technology reached Europe, it enabled the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, and the scientific and industrial revolutions that transformed the world. Paper enabled rapid publication, and gunpowder weapons changed warfare and enabled the destruction of older empires and the emergence of new nations. Plagues spread and destroyed half the population in large regions of Eurasia and new crops and technologies allowed the population in Eurasia to grow rapidly. The Mongol invasions on the Silk Road routes imprinted Mongol ethnicity and language from Xinjiang to Eastern Europe. Two of China's major religions, Buddhism and Islam, were introduced mainly via the Silk Road.

Silk Road History: The Rise and Demise of the Silk Trade

The Silk Road trade continued over a 1,500-year period. It began during the Han Empire (206 BC–220 AD) period. In 139 BC, Emperor Wudi (156–87 BC) sent out Zhang Qian (200–114 BC) to lead an embassy into Central Asia. He established diplomatic relations, and the Han sent the first trade caravans through Xinjiang. Trade grew and declined, and it reached a height when the Mongols had control of Eurasia from the Yuan Empire (1279–1368) to Eastern Europe. The fall of the Yuan Empire and the growth of maritime trade ended Silk Road trading.

Camels proved very useful for transporting products through arid regions of Central Asia.

Silk Road Trade Goods — What Was Transported
The Han Empire initially wanted big central Asian horses for their cavalry. Initially, they mainly traded silk, but later, paper and porcelain were also exported in exchange for precious metal, glassware, woolen articles, and other products from all the way from Europe and Egypt.

Silk fabrics were very valuable, light and easy to transport.

Present Time Silk Road Tourism Is Becoming More Popular
All along the Eurasian Silk Road route, travel and touring has become popular. In 2018, there were 38 percent more tourists in Altai in northwestern Xinjiang and 24 percent more in Uzbekistan than last year. Chinese tourists arriving in Albania have doubled over the previous year.



Other interesting articles

2 August 2021
Однорядный металлический карниз и его виды
More details
2 August 2021
Single-row metal cornice and its types
More details
26 March 2021
The Silk Road from China
More details
24 May 2020
Beautiful bedspreads in a modern style in the interior
More details